Discussion:
Best Films About Oklahoma
(too old to reply)
D. Spencer Hines
2006-01-24 03:18:47 UTC
Permalink
Which are the Best Films About Oklahoma or with a Theme Involving
Oklahomans?

"Black care rarely sits behind a rider whose pace is fast enough."

Theodore Roosevelt (1888)

DSH

Lux et Veritas et Libertas

Vires et Honor
Grey Satterfield
2006-01-24 17:29:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by D. Spencer Hines
Which are the Best Films About Oklahoma or with a Theme Involving
Oklahomans?
The famous Rogers & Hammerstein musical, "Oklahoma!" may be the best. There
are two versions: The original 1955 film, starring Gordon MacRae and
Shirley Jones, and a terrific 1999 version, based on the London revival of
the show, starring Hugh Jackman. Jackman is a big time musical theater
talent and is wonderful as Curly.

"Oklahoma!" is based on a play, "Green Grow the Lilacs, by Lynn Riggs, who,
like Will Rogers, was of Cherokee Indian extraction and was born near
Claremore in Eastern Oklahoma, where the play and musical are set.

A lightweight but entertaining comedy-drama you might also consider is
Stanley Kramer's "Oklahoma Crude" (1973), starring Faye Dunaway, George C.
Scott, John Mills, and Jack Palance. The film does an entertaining job of
telling what went on in the Oklahoma oil booms of the early 20th Century and
is often genuinely funny, if raunchy. It's not in a class with Kramer's "On
the Beach" or "Inherit the Wind" but it's pretty good.

I do have a strong recommendation on a book, though: "Briarpatch" (1984) by
Ross Thomas:

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0312290314/qid=1138120961/sr=2-1/ref=pd_bbs
_b_2_1/104-1765654-5095119?s=books&v=glance&n=283155

Thomas won an Edgar Award for "Briarpatch."

Thomas grew up in OKC, graduated from the University of Oklahoma, and worked
on the Daily Oklahoman in his youth. Alas, he died young. Here is a link
to a 2004 Boston Globe piece about Thomas:

http://www.boston.com/ae/books/articles/2004/05/30/grand_master_of_the_think
ing_mans_thriller/

"Briarpatch" is set in a thinly fictionalized and unnamed version of OKC as
the city was in my youth. Thomas wrote noir thrillers, all of which I liked
a lot but, for obvious reasons, I have a special fondness for "Briarpatch."

Grey Satterfield
D. Spencer Hines
2006-01-24 17:35:51 UTC
Permalink
Great Stuff!

Thank you.

Anyone else have some recommendations for films or books about Oklahoma,
both fiction and nonfiction?

DSH
Post by Grey Satterfield
Post by D. Spencer Hines
Which are the Best Films About Oklahoma or with a Theme Involving
Oklahomans?
The famous Rogers & Hammerstein musical, "Oklahoma!" may be the best.
There
are two versions: The original 1955 film, starring Gordon MacRae and
Shirley Jones, and a terrific 1999 version, based on the London revival of
the show, starring Hugh Jackman. Jackman is a big time musical theater
talent and is wonderful as Curly.
"Oklahoma!" is based on a play, "Green Grow the Lilacs, by Lynn Riggs, who,
like Will Rogers, was of Cherokee Indian extraction and was born near
Claremore in Eastern Oklahoma, where the play and musical are set.
A lightweight but entertaining comedy-drama you might also consider is
Stanley Kramer's "Oklahoma Crude" (1973), starring Faye Dunaway, George C.
Scott, John Mills, and Jack Palance. The film does an entertaining job of
telling what went on in the Oklahoma oil booms of the early 20th Century and
is often genuinely funny, if raunchy. It's not in a class with Kramer's "On
the Beach" or "Inherit the Wind" but it's pretty good.
I do have a strong recommendation on a book, though: "Briarpatch" (1984) by
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0312290314/qid=1138120961/sr=2-1/ref=pd_bbs
_b_2_1/104-1765654-5095119?s=books&v=glance&n=283155
Thomas won an Edgar Award for "Briarpatch."
Thomas grew up in OKC, graduated from the University of Oklahoma, and worked
on the Daily Oklahoman in his youth. Alas, he died young. Here is a link
http://www.boston.com/ae/books/articles/2004/05/30/grand_master_of_the_think
ing_mans_thriller/
"Briarpatch" is set in a thinly fictionalized and unnamed version of OKC as
the city was in my youth. Thomas wrote noir thrillers, all of which I liked
a lot but, for obvious reasons, I have a special fondness for
"Briarpatch."
Grey Satterfield
Jack Linthicum
2006-01-24 17:53:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by Grey Satterfield
Post by D. Spencer Hines
Which are the Best Films About Oklahoma or with a Theme Involving
Oklahomans?
The famous Rogers & Hammerstein musical, "Oklahoma!" may be the best. There
are two versions: The original 1955 film, starring Gordon MacRae and
Shirley Jones, and a terrific 1999 version, based on the London revival of
the show, starring Hugh Jackman. Jackman is a big time musical theater
talent and is wonderful as Curly.
"Oklahoma!" is based on a play, "Green Grow the Lilacs, by Lynn Riggs, who,
like Will Rogers, was of Cherokee Indian extraction and was born near
Claremore in Eastern Oklahoma, where the play and musical are set.
A lightweight but entertaining comedy-drama you might also consider is
Stanley Kramer's "Oklahoma Crude" (1973), starring Faye Dunaway, George C.
Scott, John Mills, and Jack Palance. The film does an entertaining job of
telling what went on in the Oklahoma oil booms of the early 20th Century and
is often genuinely funny, if raunchy. It's not in a class with Kramer's "On
the Beach" or "Inherit the Wind" but it's pretty good.
I do have a strong recommendation on a book, though: "Briarpatch" (1984) by
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0312290314/qid=1138120961/sr=2-1/ref=pd_bbs
_b_2_1/104-1765654-5095119?s=books&v=glance&n=283155
Thomas won an Edgar Award for "Briarpatch."
Thomas grew up in OKC, graduated from the University of Oklahoma, and worked
on the Daily Oklahoman in his youth. Alas, he died young. Here is a link
http://www.boston.com/ae/books/articles/2004/05/30/grand_master_of_the_think
ing_mans_thriller/
"Briarpatch" is set in a thinly fictionalized and unnamed version of OKC as
the city was in my youth. Thomas wrote noir thrillers, all of which I liked
a lot but, for obvious reasons, I have a special fondness for "Briarpatch."
Grey Satterfield
True Grit filmed against the magnificent Oklahoma Cascade mountains.
j***@pacbell.net
2006-01-24 19:06:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jack Linthicum
[blather about Oklahoma]
True Grit filmed against the magnificent Oklahoma Cascade mountains.
"Houston, Tranquility Base here. We've got a cynic at 10 o'clock."
Jack Linthicum
2006-01-24 19:22:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by j***@pacbell.net
Post by Jack Linthicum
[blather about Oklahoma]
True Grit filmed against the magnificent Oklahoma Cascade mountains.
"Houston, Tranquility Base here. We've got a cynic at 10 o'clock."
oshibka, oshibka

True Grit is Mammouth Mountain, Rooster Cogburn was Oregon, both in
Oklahoma IIRC.

http://community.webshots.com/photo/203062762/1203231567033814493vVkDeH
JB
2006-01-24 19:23:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jack Linthicum
True Grit filmed against the magnificent Oklahoma Cascade mountains.
True Grit the book is one of those rare gems, by Charles Portis. Highly
recommended. The movie doesn't match the book, IMHO.
La N
2006-01-24 19:57:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jack Linthicum
Post by Grey Satterfield
Post by D. Spencer Hines
Which are the Best Films About Oklahoma or with a Theme Involving
Oklahomans?
The famous Rogers & Hammerstein musical, "Oklahoma!" may be the best.
There
are two versions: The original 1955 film, starring Gordon MacRae and
Shirley Jones, and a terrific 1999 version, based on the London revival of
the show, starring Hugh Jackman. Jackman is a big time musical theater
talent and is wonderful as Curly.
"Oklahoma!" is based on a play, "Green Grow the Lilacs, by Lynn Riggs, who,
like Will Rogers, was of Cherokee Indian extraction and was born near
Claremore in Eastern Oklahoma, where the play and musical are set.
A lightweight but entertaining comedy-drama you might also consider is
Stanley Kramer's "Oklahoma Crude" (1973), starring Faye Dunaway, George C.
Scott, John Mills, and Jack Palance. The film does an entertaining job of
telling what went on in the Oklahoma oil booms of the early 20th Century and
is often genuinely funny, if raunchy. It's not in a class with Kramer's "On
the Beach" or "Inherit the Wind" but it's pretty good.
I do have a strong recommendation on a book, though: "Briarpatch" (1984) by
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0312290314/qid=1138120961/sr=2-1/ref=pd_bbs
_b_2_1/104-1765654-5095119?s=books&v=glance&n=283155
Thomas won an Edgar Award for "Briarpatch."
Thomas grew up in OKC, graduated from the University of Oklahoma, and worked
on the Daily Oklahoman in his youth. Alas, he died young. Here is a link
http://www.boston.com/ae/books/articles/2004/05/30/grand_master_of_the_think
ing_mans_thriller/
"Briarpatch" is set in a thinly fictionalized and unnamed version of OKC as
the city was in my youth. Thomas wrote noir thrillers, all of which I liked
a lot but, for obvious reasons, I have a special fondness for
"Briarpatch."
Grey Satterfield
True Grit filmed against the magnificent Oklahoma Cascade mountains.
And then there's the song "I'm Proud to be an Okie from Muskogee" (or
something like that) ...%)

- n.
D. Spencer Hines
2006-01-24 20:43:56 UTC
Permalink
<http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0312290314/qid=1138120961/sr=2-1/ref=pd_bbs_b_2_1/104-1765654-5095119?s=books&v=glance&n=283155>

<http://www.boston.com/ae/books/articles/2004/05/30/grand_master_of_the_thinking_mans_thriller/>

If you enclose your URL's like this and are using a Modern Operating System
your readers will be able to far more easily access the information you are
asking them to read.

See Below, for the way not to do it.

Cheers,

DSH
Post by Grey Satterfield
I do have a strong recommendation on a book, though: "Briarpatch" (1984)
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0312290314/qid=1138120961/sr=2-1/ref=pd_bbs
_b_2_1/104-1765654-5095119?s=books&v=glance&n=283155
Thomas won an Edgar Award for "Briarpatch."
Thomas grew up in OKC, graduated from the University of Oklahoma, and
worked on the Daily Oklahoman in his youth. Alas, he died young. Here is
http://www.boston.com/ae/books/articles/2004/05/30/grand_master_of_the_think
ing_mans_thriller/
"Briarpatch" is set in a thinly fictionalized and unnamed version of OKC as
the city was in my youth. Thomas wrote noir thrillers, all of which I
liked a lot but, for obvious reasons, I have a special fondness for
Briarpatch."
Grey Satterfield
Grey Satterfield
2006-01-24 23:11:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by D. Spencer Hines
<http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0312290314/qid=1138120961/sr=2-1/ref=pd_bbs_
b_2_1/104-1765654-5095119?s=books&v=glance&n=283155>
<http://www.boston.com/ae/books/articles/2004/05/30/grand_master_of_the_thinki
ng_mans_thriller/>
If you enclose your URL's like this and are using a Modern Operating System
your readers will be able to far more easily access the information you are
asking them to read.
See Below, for the way not to do it.
Cheers,
DSH
The matter of using multi-line links to URLs was debated in an earlier
thread. The consensus seemed to be that, because modern operating systems
and newsreaders see and understand links, no matter how long, the length of
the link is immaterial. If Spencer's OS or newsreader is so primitive that
it can't identify and open multi-line links, then I suggest he upgrade.
Otherwise he must simply live with the "problem" if that is how he perceives
it because it doesn't seem to bother anybody who isn't into gamesmanship.

Cheers, indeed

Grey Satterfield -- who has relearned the hard lesson that no good deed goes
unpunished.
D. Spencer Hines
2006-01-25 00:19:00 UTC
Permalink
Twaddle!

My Operating System is State Of The Art.

Windows XP Professional SP2.

What is Gutman-Satterfield using for his OS?

Gutman-Satterfield is blowing smoke and flashing mirrors again.

He is too technologically illiterate to Do The Right Thing, which is to make
his URL's look like THIS -- if he actually expects folks to READ what he
cites.

<http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0312290314/qid=1138120961/sr=2-1/ref=pd_bbs_b_2_1/104-1765654-5095119?s=books&v=glance&n=283155>

<http://www.boston.com/ae/books/articles/2004/05/30/grand_master_of_the_thinking_mans_thriller/>

"Too Late Smart" as they like to say in New York.

Hilarious!

DSH
Post by Grey Satterfield
Post by D. Spencer Hines
If you enclose your URL's like this and are using a Modern Operating
System your readers will be able to far more easily access the
information you
are asking them to read.
See Below, for the way not to do it.
Cheers,
DSH
The matter of using multi-line links to URLs was debated in an earlier
thread. The consensus seemed to be that, because modern operating systems
and newsreaders see and understand links, no matter how long, the length
of the link is immaterial. If Spencer's OS or newsreader is so primitive
that it can't identify and open multi-line links, then I suggest he
upgrade.
Otherwise he must simply live with the "problem" if that is how he
perceives it because it doesn't seem to bother anybody who isn't into
gamesmanship.
Cheers, indeed
Grey Satterfield -- who has relearned the hard lesson that no good deed
goes unpunished.
D. Spencer Hines
2006-01-25 00:25:32 UTC
Permalink
Twaddle!

My Operating System is State Of The Art.

Windows XP Professional SP2.

What is Gutman-Satterfield using for his OS?

Gutman-Satterfield is blowing smoke and flashing mirrors again.

He is too technologically illiterate to Do The Right Thing, which is to make
his URL's look like THIS -- if he actually expects folks to READ what he
cites.

<http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0312290314/qid=1138120961/sr=2-1/ref=pd_bbs_b_2_1/104-1765654-5095119?s=books&v=glance&n=283155>

<http://www.boston.com/ae/books/articles/2004/05/30/grand_master_of_the_thinking_mans_thriller/>

"Too Late Smart" as they like to say in New York.

Hilarious!

DSH
Post by Grey Satterfield
Post by D. Spencer Hines
If you enclose your URL's like this and are using a Modern Operating
System your readers will be able to far more easily access the
information you are asking them to read.
See Below, for the way not to do it.
Cheers,
DSH
The matter of using multi-line links to URLs was debated in an earlier
thread. The consensus seemed to be that, because modern operating systems
and newsreaders see and understand links, no matter how long, the length
of the link is immaterial. If Spencer's OS or newsreader is so primitive
that it can't identify and open multi-line links, then I suggest he
upgrade.
Otherwise he must simply live with the "problem" if that is how
he perceives it because it doesn't seem to bother anybody who isn't into
gamesmanship.
Cheers, indeed
Grey Satterfield -- who has relearned the hard lesson that no good deed
goes unpunished.
Peter Jason
2006-01-25 02:50:39 UTC
Permalink
Codswallop.

I have the latest & greatest.

Windows XP Professional with Media Centre2005.

Cop that!
Post by D. Spencer Hines
Twaddle!
My Operating System is State Of The Art.
Windows XP Professional SP2.
What is Gutman-Satterfield using for his OS?
Gutman-Satterfield is blowing smoke and flashing
mirrors again.
He is too technologically illiterate to Do The
Right Thing, which is to make
his URL's look like THIS -- if he actually
expects folks to READ what he
cites.
<http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0312290314/qid=1138120961/sr=2-1/ref=pd_bbs_b_2_1/104-1765654-5095119?s=books&v=glance&n=283155>
<http://www.boston.com/ae/books/articles/2004/05/30/grand_master_of_the_thinking_mans_thriller/>
"Too Late Smart" as they like to say in New
York.
Hilarious!
DSH
Post by Grey Satterfield
Post by D. Spencer Hines
If you enclose your URL's like this and are
using a Modern Operating
System your readers will be able to far more
easily access the
information you are asking them to read.
See Below, for the way not to do it.
Cheers,
DSH
The matter of using multi-line links to URLs
was debated in an earlier
thread. The consensus seemed to be that,
because modern operating systems
and newsreaders see and understand links, no
matter how long, the length
of the link is immaterial. If Spencer's OS or
newsreader is so primitive
that it can't identify and open multi-line
links, then I suggest he upgrade.
Otherwise he must simply live with the
"problem" if that is how
he perceives it because it doesn't seem to
bother anybody who isn't into
gamesmanship.
Cheers, indeed
Grey Satterfield -- who has relearned the hard
lesson that no good deed
goes unpunished.
William Black
2006-01-25 10:34:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by D. Spencer Hines
Twaddle!
My Operating System is State Of The Art.
Windows XP Professional SP2.
Nothing sold by Microsoft is 'state of the art'.

It meets the requirement for a domestic appliance. It's a cheap and
reasonably reliable product sold in millions.
--
William Black

I've seen things you people wouldn't believe.
Barbeques on fire by the chalets past the castle headland
I watched the gift shops glitter in the darkness off the Newborough gate
All these moments will be lost in time, like icecream on the beach
Time for tea.
D. Patterson
2006-01-25 10:37:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by William Black
Post by D. Spencer Hines
Twaddle!
My Operating System is State Of The Art.
Windows XP Professional SP2.
Nothing sold by Microsoft is 'state of the art'.
It meets the requirement for a domestic appliance. It's a cheap and
reasonably reliable product sold in millions.
There is absolutely NOTHING whatsoever that is "reasonably reliable"
about Microsoft Windows. It crashes on its own without even using it.
William Black
2006-01-25 11:19:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by D. Patterson
Post by William Black
Post by D. Spencer Hines
Twaddle!
My Operating System is State Of The Art.
Windows XP Professional SP2.
Nothing sold by Microsoft is 'state of the art'.
It meets the requirement for a domestic appliance. It's a cheap and
reasonably reliable product sold in millions.
There is absolutely NOTHING whatsoever that is "reasonably reliable"
about Microsoft Windows. It crashes on its own without even using it.
It's reliable enough for people to use for 'non critical' purposes.

If you need something reliable or sophisticated you run a variety of UNIX.
--
William Black

I've seen things you people wouldn't believe.
Barbeques on fire by the chalets past the castle headland
I watched the gift shops glitter in the darkness off the Newborough gate
All these moments will be lost in time, like icecream on the beach
Time for tea.
D. Patterson
2006-01-25 11:54:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by William Black
Post by D. Patterson
Post by William Black
Post by D. Spencer Hines
Twaddle!
My Operating System is State Of The Art.
Windows XP Professional SP2.
Nothing sold by Microsoft is 'state of the art'.
It meets the requirement for a domestic appliance. It's a cheap and
reasonably reliable product sold in millions.
There is absolutely NOTHING whatsoever that is "reasonably reliable"
about Microsoft Windows. It crashes on its own without even using it.
It's reliable enough for people to use for 'non critical' purposes.
Hell, it can't even keep from crashing while playing the latest DVD from
Hollywood. Effective and competent technical support from Microsoft and
its accomplices is virtually non-existant and used as a bait and switch
racket to increase income while evading responsibility for the actual
expense of providing effective support.
Post by William Black
If you need something reliable or sophisticated you run a variety of UNIX.
Now there is another joke. The operating system with the 8+3 hashed
passwording system, until shadows came into use. The operating system
with the split personalities and the identity crisis which makes even
the Canadians appear to be utterly monolithic in their national
identities. SCO will soon be bankrupt, and IBM is still trying to kill
LINUX with FUD about the mythical need for indemnification, this time in
IT Week and <Computing.co.uk>. Talk about shakedowns....
Grey Satterfield
2006-01-25 20:20:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by D. Patterson
Post by William Black
Post by D. Patterson
Post by William Black
Post by D. Spencer Hines
Twaddle!
My Operating System is State Of The Art.
Windows XP Professional SP2.
Nothing sold by Microsoft is 'state of the art'.
It meets the requirement for a domestic appliance. It's a cheap and
reasonably reliable product sold in millions.
There is absolutely NOTHING whatsoever that is "reasonably reliable"
about Microsoft Windows. It crashes on its own without even using it.
It's reliable enough for people to use for 'non critical' purposes.
Hell, it can't even keep from crashing while playing the latest DVD from
Hollywood. Effective and competent technical support from Microsoft and
its accomplices is virtually non-existant and used as a bait and switch
racket to increase income while evading responsibility for the actual
expense of providing effective support.
Except for those who have MS Enterprise licenses and pay through the nose
for telephone support, MS support is nonexistent for all practical purposes.
Windows XP Professional and Windows Server are solid, reliable platforms.
As noted in an earlier post, XP has too many security vulnerabilities but
its stability is just fine.

Grey Satterfield
Fred J. McCall
2006-01-28 01:34:49 UTC
Permalink
"D. Patterson" <***@fidalgo.net> wrote:

:William Black wrote:
:
:> "D. Patterson" <***@fidalgo.net> wrote in message
:> news:***@fidalgo.net...
:>
:>>
:>>William Black wrote:
:>>>
:>>>Nothing sold by Microsoft is 'state of the art'.
:>>>
:>>>It meets the requirement for a domestic appliance. It's a cheap and
:>>>reasonably reliable product sold in millions.
:>>
:>>There is absolutely NOTHING whatsoever that is "reasonably reliable"
:>>about Microsoft Windows. It crashes on its own without even using it.
:>
:> It's reliable enough for people to use for 'non critical' purposes.
:
:Hell, it can't even keep from crashing while playing the latest DVD from
:Hollywood. Effective and competent technical support from Microsoft and
:its accomplices is virtually non-existant and used as a bait and switch
:racket to increase income while evading responsibility for the actual
:expense of providing effective support.

Sounds like a user problem, Mr Patterson. The rest of the world
doesn't seem to have such serious problems.

:> If you need something reliable or sophisticated you run a variety of UNIX.
:
:Now there is another joke.

So let me ask the same question I asked Wee Willie; eliminating Unix
and Windows, just what do *YOU* think is 'state of the art'?

:The operating system with the 8+3 hashed
:passwording system, until shadows came into use.

Uh, no.

:The operating system
:with the split personalities and the identity crisis which makes even
:the Canadians appear to be utterly monolithic in their national
:identities.

Well, there is that.

:SCO will soon be bankrupt,

One certainly hopes so, given their attempts to turn into just another
of the firms that makes all their money on lawsuits and threats of
lawsuits.

:and IBM is still trying to kill
:LINUX with FUD about the mythical need for indemnification, this time in
:IT Week and <Computing.co.uk>. Talk about shakedowns....

That makes no sense at all. If IBM were trying to kill Linux, why did
they contribute so much code to it?

Mr Patterson, your knowledge of operating systems appears to be at the
same level as your knowledge of politics.
--
"Ignorance is preferable to error, and he is less remote from the
truth who believes nothing than he who believes what is wrong."
-- Thomas Jefferson
Grey Satterfield
2006-01-25 20:17:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by William Black
Post by D. Patterson
Post by William Black
Post by D. Spencer Hines
Twaddle!
My Operating System is State Of The Art.
Windows XP Professional SP2.
Nothing sold by Microsoft is 'state of the art'.
It meets the requirement for a domestic appliance. It's a cheap and
reasonably reliable product sold in millions.
There is absolutely NOTHING whatsoever that is "reasonably reliable"
about Microsoft Windows. It crashes on its own without even using it.
It's reliable enough for people to use for 'non critical' purposes.
If you need something reliable or sophisticated you run a variety of UNIX.
That's a controversial issue. Many, many mission critical applications are
now running using the Windows OS -- including EVERYTHING on the Oklahoma
State Courts Network:

http://www.oscn.net/applications/oscn/start.asp

Grey Satterfield
Fred J. McCall
2006-01-28 02:04:27 UTC
Permalink
Grey Satterfield <***@oscn.net> wrote:

:On 1/25/06 5:19 AM, in article dr7mop$ck4$***@news.freedom2surf.net, "William
:Black" <***@hotmail.co.uk> wrote:
:
:>
:> "D. Patterson" <***@fidalgo.net> wrote in message
:> news:***@fidalgo.net...
:>>
:>>
:>> William Black wrote:
:>>
:>>> "D. Spencer Hines" <***@hotmail.com> wrote in message
:>>> news:uAzBf.335$***@eagle.america.net...
:>>>
:>>>> Twaddle!
:>>>>
:>>>> My Operating System is State Of The Art.
:>>>>
:>>>> Windows XP Professional SP2.
:>>>>
:>>>
:>>> Nothing sold by Microsoft is 'state of the art'.
:>>>
:>>> It meets the requirement for a domestic appliance. It's a cheap and
:>>> reasonably reliable product sold in millions.
:>>
:>> There is absolutely NOTHING whatsoever that is "reasonably reliable"
:>> about Microsoft Windows. It crashes on its own without even using it.
:>
:> It's reliable enough for people to use for 'non critical' purposes.
:>
:> If you need something reliable or sophisticated you run a variety of UNIX.
:
:That's a controversial issue. Many, many mission critical applications are
:now running using the Windows OS -- including EVERYTHING on the Oklahoma
:State Courts Network:

Also including most military aircraft planning.
--
"The reasonable man adapts himself to the world; the unreasonable
man persists in trying to adapt the world to himself. Therefore,
all progress depends on the unreasonable man."
--George Bernard Shaw
Grey Satterfield
2006-01-25 20:13:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by D. Patterson
Post by William Black
Post by D. Spencer Hines
Twaddle!
My Operating System is State Of The Art.
Windows XP Professional SP2.
Nothing sold by Microsoft is 'state of the art'.
It meets the requirement for a domestic appliance. It's a cheap and
reasonably reliable product sold in millions.
There is absolutely NOTHING whatsoever that is "reasonably reliable"
about Microsoft Windows. It crashes on its own without even using it.
Actually XP is a pretty stable platform. Some of the older versions of
Windows were, ah, less so. XP still has too many security issues but it's
ability to avoid the Blue Screen of Death is admirable.

I built the network for the Oklahoma Supreme Court about 10 years ago and
used Windows 95 on the workstations and NT on the servers. The combination
worked reasonably well. In 2001 we upgraded everything to XP, By that time
we had created a statewide network for the courts and had hired a full time
MIS director, which had been a collateral duty for me; I had become the
Court's IS Coordinator, a job which I retained until I retired last year.
[1]

I have used a Mac at home for the past three years and run the latest
version of OS X, v. 10.4.4 on it. It's a nice OS. I still run XP Pro on a
desktop machine here, too, because there are several applications I use that
either lack a Mac version or the Mac version that exists is markedly
inferior to the one for Windows.

Grey Satterfield

[1] Perhaps the inimitable D. Spencer Hines could share with us his
experience as an IT professional -- if any. :>)
Andrew Chaplin
2006-01-25 11:05:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by William Black
Post by D. Spencer Hines
Twaddle!
My Operating System is State Of The Art.
Windows XP Professional SP2.
Nothing sold by Microsoft is 'state of the art'.
It meets the requirement for a domestic appliance. It's a cheap and
reasonably reliable product sold in millions.
"*Reasonably* reliable"? I do believe that qualifies as a howler.
Other than that, spot on.
--
Andrew Chaplin
SIT MIHI GLADIUS SICUT SANCTO MARTINO
(If you're going to e-mail me, you'll have to get "yourfinger." out.)
Fred J. McCall
2006-01-28 01:18:12 UTC
Permalink
"William Black" <***@hotmail.co.uk> wrote:

:
:"D. Spencer Hines" <***@hotmail.com> wrote in message
:news:uAzBf.335$***@eagle.america.net...
:> Twaddle!
:>
:> My Operating System is State Of The Art.
:>
:> Windows XP Professional SP2.
:
:Nothing sold by Microsoft is 'state of the art'.

So, I'm curious, Wee Willie. Just what do you think *is* 'state of
the art'?

:It meets the requirement for a domestic appliance. It's a cheap and
:reasonably reliable product sold in millions.

Nothing says domestic appliances can't be 'state of the art'.
--
"The reasonable man adapts himself to the world; the unreasonable
man persists in trying to adapt the world to himself. Therefore,
all progress depends on the unreasonable man."
--George Bernard Shaw
Grey Satterfield
2006-01-25 00:48:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by D. Spencer Hines
Post by Grey Satterfield
The matter of using multi-line links to URLs was debated in an earlier
thread. The consensus seemed to be that, because modern operating systems
and newsreaders see and understand links, no matter how long, the length of
the link is immaterial. If Spencer's OS or newsreader is so primitive that
it can't identify and open multi-line links, then I suggest he upgrade.
Otherwise he must simply live with the "problem" if that is how he perceives
it because it doesn't seem to bother anybody who isn't into gamesmanship.
Cheers, indeed
Grey Satterfield -- who has relearned the hard lesson that no good deed
goes unpunished.
Twaddle!
My Operating System is State Of The Art.
Windows XP Professional SP2.
What is Gutman-Satterfield using for his OS?
Gutman-Satterfield is blowing smoke and flashing mirrors again.
He is too technologically illiterate to Do The Right Thing, which is to make
his URL's look like THIS -- if he actually expects folks to READ what he
cites.
The truth comes out. Don't call us about this, we'll call you, or not.

Grey Satterfield
D. Spencer Hines
2006-01-25 01:15:50 UTC
Permalink
Yep, there you have it.

G-S is technologically illiterate.

No Surprises There.

DSH

"
Post by D. Spencer Hines
Gutman-Satterfield is blowing smoke and flashing mirrors again.
He is too technologically illiterate to Do The Right Thing, which is to
make his URL's look like THIS -- if he actually expects folks to
READ what he cites.
<http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0312290314/qid=1138120961/sr=2-1/ref=pd_bbs_b_2_1/104-1765654-5095119?s=books&v=glance&n=283155>
The truth comes out...
[Gutman-Satterfield]
RTO Trainer
2006-01-25 01:05:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by La N
Post by Jack Linthicum
Post by Grey Satterfield
Post by D. Spencer Hines
Which are the Best Films About Oklahoma or with a Theme Involving
Oklahomans?
The famous Rogers & Hammerstein musical, "Oklahoma!" may be the best.
There
are two versions: The original 1955 film, starring Gordon MacRae and
Shirley Jones, and a terrific 1999 version, based on the London revival of
the show, starring Hugh Jackman. Jackman is a big time musical theater
talent and is wonderful as Curly.
"Oklahoma!" is based on a play, "Green Grow the Lilacs, by Lynn Riggs, who,
like Will Rogers, was of Cherokee Indian extraction and was born near
Claremore in Eastern Oklahoma, where the play and musical are set.
A lightweight but entertaining comedy-drama you might also consider is
Stanley Kramer's "Oklahoma Crude" (1973), starring Faye Dunaway, George C.
Scott, John Mills, and Jack Palance. The film does an entertaining job of
telling what went on in the Oklahoma oil booms of the early 20th Century and
is often genuinely funny, if raunchy. It's not in a class with Kramer's "On
the Beach" or "Inherit the Wind" but it's pretty good.
I do have a strong recommendation on a book, though: "Briarpatch" (1984) by
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0312290314/qid=1138120961/sr=2-1/ref=pd_bbs
_b_2_1/104-1765654-5095119?s=books&v=glance&n=283155
Thomas won an Edgar Award for "Briarpatch."
Thomas grew up in OKC, graduated from the University of Oklahoma, and worked
on the Daily Oklahoman in his youth. Alas, he died young. Here is a link
http://www.boston.com/ae/books/articles/2004/05/30/grand_master_of_the_think
ing_mans_thriller/
"Briarpatch" is set in a thinly fictionalized and unnamed version of OKC as
the city was in my youth. Thomas wrote noir thrillers, all of which I liked
a lot but, for obvious reasons, I have a special fondness for "Briarpatch."
Grey Satterfield
True Grit filmed against the magnificent Oklahoma Cascade mountains.
And then there's the song "I'm Proud to be an Okie from Muskogee" (or
something like that) ...%)
- n.
Movies filmed in Oklahoma:

The Outsiders (C. Thomas Howell, Ralph Macchio, Emilio Estevez ...)
Tulsa

Rain Man (Tom Cruise, Dustin Hoffman, Valeria Golino ...) El Reno

Rumble Fish (Matt Dillon, Mickey Rourke, Vincent Spano ...) Tulsa

UHF ('Weird Al' Yankovic, Victoria Jackson, Kevin McCarthy ...) Tulsa

Elizabethtown (Russel Crowe, Orlando Bloom,...) Tulsa
Tank Fixer
2006-01-25 07:28:41 UTC
Permalink
In article <***@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com>,
on 24 Jan 2006 09:53:11 -0800,
Post by Jack Linthicum
Post by Grey Satterfield
Post by D. Spencer Hines
Which are the Best Films About Oklahoma or with a Theme Involving
Oklahomans?
The famous Rogers & Hammerstein musical, "Oklahoma!" may be the best. There
are two versions: The original 1955 film, starring Gordon MacRae and
Shirley Jones, and a terrific 1999 version, based on the London revival of
the show, starring Hugh Jackman. Jackman is a big time musical theater
talent and is wonderful as Curly.
"Oklahoma!" is based on a play, "Green Grow the Lilacs, by Lynn Riggs, who,
like Will Rogers, was of Cherokee Indian extraction and was born near
Claremore in Eastern Oklahoma, where the play and musical are set.
A lightweight but entertaining comedy-drama you might also consider is
Stanley Kramer's "Oklahoma Crude" (1973), starring Faye Dunaway, George C.
Scott, John Mills, and Jack Palance. The film does an entertaining job of
telling what went on in the Oklahoma oil booms of the early 20th Century and
is often genuinely funny, if raunchy. It's not in a class with Kramer's "On
the Beach" or "Inherit the Wind" but it's pretty good.
I do have a strong recommendation on a book, though: "Briarpatch" (1984) by
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0312290314/qid=1138120961/sr=2-1/ref=pd_bbs
_b_2_1/104-1765654-5095119?s=books&v=glance&n=283155
Thomas won an Edgar Award for "Briarpatch."
Thomas grew up in OKC, graduated from the University of Oklahoma, and worked
on the Daily Oklahoman in his youth. Alas, he died young. Here is a link
http://www.boston.com/ae/books/articles/2004/05/30/grand_master_of_the_think
ing_mans_thriller/
"Briarpatch" is set in a thinly fictionalized and unnamed version of OKC as
the city was in my youth. Thomas wrote noir thrillers, all of which I liked
a lot but, for obvious reasons, I have a special fondness for "Briarpatch."
Grey Satterfield
True Grit filmed against the magnificent Oklahoma Cascade mountains.
Oklahoma Cascade ?

I think you may be a wee bit confused..
--
When dealing with propaganda terminology one sometimes always speaks in
variable absolutes. This is not to be mistaken for an unbiased slant.
Jack Linthicum
2006-01-25 11:21:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tank Fixer
on 24 Jan 2006 09:53:11 -0800,
Post by Jack Linthicum
Post by Grey Satterfield
Post by D. Spencer Hines
Which are the Best Films About Oklahoma or with a Theme Involving
Oklahomans?
The famous Rogers & Hammerstein musical, "Oklahoma!" may be the best. There
are two versions: The original 1955 film, starring Gordon MacRae and
Shirley Jones, and a terrific 1999 version, based on the London revival of
the show, starring Hugh Jackman. Jackman is a big time musical theater
talent and is wonderful as Curly.
"Oklahoma!" is based on a play, "Green Grow the Lilacs, by Lynn Riggs, who,
like Will Rogers, was of Cherokee Indian extraction and was born near
Claremore in Eastern Oklahoma, where the play and musical are set.
A lightweight but entertaining comedy-drama you might also consider is
Stanley Kramer's "Oklahoma Crude" (1973), starring Faye Dunaway, George C.
Scott, John Mills, and Jack Palance. The film does an entertaining job of
telling what went on in the Oklahoma oil booms of the early 20th Century and
is often genuinely funny, if raunchy. It's not in a class with Kramer's "On
the Beach" or "Inherit the Wind" but it's pretty good.
I do have a strong recommendation on a book, though: "Briarpatch" (1984) by
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0312290314/qid=1138120961/sr=2-1/ref=pd_bbs
_b_2_1/104-1765654-5095119?s=books&v=glance&n=283155
Thomas won an Edgar Award for "Briarpatch."
Thomas grew up in OKC, graduated from the University of Oklahoma, and worked
on the Daily Oklahoman in his youth. Alas, he died young. Here is a link
http://www.boston.com/ae/books/articles/2004/05/30/grand_master_of_the_think
ing_mans_thriller/
"Briarpatch" is set in a thinly fictionalized and unnamed version of OKC as
the city was in my youth. Thomas wrote noir thrillers, all of which I liked
a lot but, for obvious reasons, I have a special fondness for "Briarpatch."
Grey Satterfield
True Grit filmed against the magnificent Oklahoma Cascade mountains.
Oklahoma Cascade ?
I think you may be a wee bit confused..
--
When dealing with propaganda terminology one sometimes always speaks in
variable absolutes. This is not to be mistaken for an unbiased slant.
Not I, not I. I erred on which movie was California (Mammoth Mt.) and
which Oregon but not on the places used.

Goofs for
Rooster Cogburn (1975)

* Errors in geography: The movie is set in Oklahoma, but features
unrealistically large mountains.
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0073636/locations

Filming Locations for
Rooster Cogburn (1975)

Bend, Oregon, USA

Deschutes National Forest, Oregon, USA

Grants Pass, Oregon, USA

Rogue River, Oregon, USA
Brian Sharrock
2006-01-25 10:40:00 UTC
Permalink
"Grey Satterfield" <***@oscn.net> wrote in message news:BFFBBFFE.23FAE%***@oscn.net...
snip
Post by Grey Satterfield
A lightweight but entertaining comedy-drama you might also consider is
Stanley Kramer's "Oklahoma Crude" (1973), starring Faye Dunaway, George C.
Scott, John Mills, and Jack Palance. The film does an entertaining job of
telling what went on in the Oklahoma oil booms of the early 20th Century and
is often genuinely funny, if raunchy.
That movie release coincided with a period when I was involved
in a multi-company bid to a US Gummint purchasing agency
(OK : the agency was based in Orlando!).
Anyway, I seemed to spend most of that year travelling
back-and-forth (it was pre-Air Miles) and almost every
flight seemed to be showing 'Oklahoma Crude' whether it
was trans-Atlantic or New York ~ California ....
IIRC, there is one _crude_ word in the dialog(ue) ...
I grew to expect the sudden collective sucking-in of breath
from the passengers ... followed by the murmur as each
asked of their seat-neighbo(u)r ; 'hey; did she just say **** ?
[It was early seventies ... ]
--
Brian
holiman@westUSgulf
2006-01-29 10:18:19 UTC
Permalink
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
The best film of all time about Oklahoma is "Tulsa."
Susan Hayward, Robert Preston, Chill Wills.
The best scene: the first gusher hole that splatters black
crude on everyone's faces.
The best line: "We're making 1000 dollars an hour!"

Cheers, David H
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

ray o'hara
2006-01-27 01:23:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by Grey Satterfield
Post by D. Spencer Hines
Which are the Best Films About Oklahoma or with a Theme Involving
Oklahomans?
The famous Rogers & Hammerstein musical, "Oklahoma!" may be the best.
There
Post by Grey Satterfield
are two versions: The original 1955 film, starring Gordon MacRae and
Shirley Jones, and a terrific 1999 version, based on the London revival of
the show, starring Hugh Jackman. Jackman is a big time musical theater
talent and is wonderful as Curly.
i thought jackman sucked. and the brit remake was seariously lacking
compared to the original and also to a stage production in boston.
D. Spencer Hines
2006-01-27 01:34:06 UTC
Permalink
There must be more Significant Films about Oklahoma and Oklahomans.

_Grapes Of Wrath_ is probably the greatest of all.

John Steinbeck's original title was _The Oklahomans_.

http://www.npr.org/programs/morning/features/patc/grapesofwrath/

Other portrayals of the Sooners -- and the Oklahoma Land Rush of 1889?

http://www.library.cornell.edu/Reps/DOCS/landrush.htm

http://www.ok-history.mus.ok.us/enc/landrun.htm

C'mon, you folks can do better than this effort to date.

DSH
Grey Satterfield
2006-01-27 16:35:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by ray o'hara
Post by D. Spencer Hines
Which are the Best Films About Oklahoma or with a Theme Involving
Oklahomans?
The famous Rogers & Hammerstein musical, "Oklahoma!" may be the best. There
are two versions: The original 1955 film, starring Gordon MacRae and Shirley
Jones, and a terrific 1999 version, based on the London revival of the show,
starring Hugh Jackman. Jackman is a big time musical theater talent and is
wonderful as Curly.
i thought jackman sucked. and the brit remake was seariously lacking
compared to the original and also to a stage production in boston.
The original London cast recording of Oklahoma!, which starred Jackman,
received an average of 4.0 stars out of 5 on the Amazon Web site.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00002EPLJ/qid=1138379594/sr=8-4/ref=pd_bbs
_4/104-1765654-5095119?n=507846&s=music&v=glance

IMDb voters have given Jackman's movie version a rating of 8.1 out of 10.

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0216048/combined?fr=c2l0ZT1kZnx0dD0xfGZiPXV8cG49
MHxrdz0xfHE9b0tMQUhPTUEhfGZ0PTF8bXg9MjB8bG09NTAwfGNvPTF8aHRtbD0xfG5tPTE_;fc=
2;ft=75;fm=1

What one thinks of Jackman's performance is all about judgment and taste --
and considering the source. One might be persuaded that Ray is as negative
and his judgment as skewed where the arts are concerned as they are
concerning politics but I shall leave that decision to others.

Grey Satterfield
a***@zdnetonebox.com
2006-01-24 19:59:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by JB
Post by Jack Linthicum
True Grit filmed against the magnificent Oklahoma Cascade mountains.
True Grit the book is one of those rare gems, by Charles Portis. Highly
recommended. The movie doesn't match the book, IMHO.
And neither match any of the newsgroups you cross-posted this to. I've
already killfiled the troll who originated this thread, as have
doubtless legions of others.

There are well over 200,000 newsgroups covering almost as many topics.
There is thus no need to post off-topic in any given newsgroup and it's
considered rude to do it. The only reason I haven't killfiled you for
this transgression is an earlier remark you made which implied you're a
usenet newbie who doesn't know any better. Do you know how to search
newsgroups by topic?
David E. Powell
2006-01-25 01:47:36 UTC
Permalink
As this is sci.military.naval, "Pearl Harbor" is the best one covering
the unfortunate fate of the Battleship Oklahoma and her crew at that
battle.

In terms of movies involving the U.S. state in question, isn't the last
part of the To, Cruise/Nicole Kidman movie "Far and Away" set in the
Oklahoma Land Rush?

David
D. Spencer Hines
2006-01-25 01:57:18 UTC
Permalink
Indeed It Is!

And that important event appears in other films.

DSH
Post by David E. Powell
As this is sci.military.naval, "Pearl Harbor" is the best one covering
the unfortunate fate of the Battleship Oklahoma and her crew at that
battle.
In terms of movies involving the U.S. state in question, isn't the last
part of the To, Cruise/Nicole Kidman movie "Far and Away" set in the
Oklahoma Land Rush?
David
DM
2006-01-25 05:42:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by David E. Powell
As this is sci.military.naval, "Pearl Harbor" is the best one covering
the unfortunate fate of the Battleship Oklahoma and her crew at that
battle.
LOL - "Tora, Tora, Tora" surely? :)

DM
David E. Powell
2006-01-25 20:05:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by DM
Post by David E. Powell
As this is sci.military.naval, "Pearl Harbor" is the best one covering
the unfortunate fate of the Battleship Oklahoma and her crew at that
battle.
LOL - "Tora, Tora, Tora" surely? :)
Should have mentioned that one too! Thank you. Also "Pearl" might have
had it (It used some of the same footage IIRC)
Post by DM
DM
D. Spencer Hines
2006-01-25 02:03:53 UTC
Permalink
So, why haven't more Ross Thomas political thrillers been turned into films?

Were any?

DSH
Grey Satterfield
2006-01-25 19:50:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by D. Spencer Hines
So, why haven't more Ross Thomas political thrillers been turned into films?
Were any?
A few were. Here is a link to Thomas's IMDb biography:

http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0859469/bio

According to this biography, "[Thomas's] wife said, the very subtleties and
ambiguities of plot and characters cherished by readers of Mr. Thomas's
books appeared to prevent the rest of them from becoming movies. "He didn't
mind", she said. "What entertained him and his readers didn't necessarily
translate to the screen very easily", she said.

Maybe so.

Grey Satterfield
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